Zotac GeForce GTX 1050 Ti OC Edition Review – The Budget Graphics Card

Table of Contents

Zotac GTX 1050 Ti OC Test Setup, Temperature and Noise

In testing the Zotac GTX 1050 Ti OC, I am using a Gigabyte Z170X Gaming 7 motherboard powered with an Intel Core i7-6700K. The CPU is set to run at its default stock speeds. Below are the rest of the system specifications:

Operating System: Windows 10 Pro 64bit
Motherboard: Gigabyte Z170X Gaming 7
Processor: Intel Core i7-6700K
CPU Cooler: Cryorig A40 Ultimate All-in-One
Memory: Corsair Vengeance LED DDR4
Graphics card: Zotac GTX 1050 Ti OC
Storage Drives: Zotac Sonix 480GB NVMe SSD, WD Blue SSD
Power Supply: FSP Aurum PT 1000W
Chassis: In Win 805

Below is a GPU-Z screenshot of the said graphics card:

During my tests and benchmarking, I was using the GeForce driver version 376.09 for Windows 10 64bit. All games are tested in three resolutions, namely: 1920×1080 or full HD, 2560×1440 or WQHD and 3840×2160 or 4K ultra HD.

Temperature and Noise

The Zotac GTX 1050 Ti’s fans don’t stop even when in idle or light gaming situation. Once you power on your computer, the fans on this card starts to spin as well. However, I can say that even without the casing’s side panel covered and me sitting right next to the CPU, the graphics card is noticeably silent even when I am gaming. I can barely hear the fans specially when I closed the CPU’s case.

The GTX 1050 Ti we have here can go as low as 36° to 43° degree Celsius when idle to light load. Temperature can go as high as 63° degree Celsius while playing some games. As you can see, not only that it’s power efficient, it doesn’t produce much heat as well. How about its performance? Can it play Crysis (3)? Next page, let’s see the benchmark results we got while testing the card.

Zotac GeForce GTX 1050Ti OC graphics card pricing and availability
For US: available at eBay here and B&H here
For UK: available at Amazon UK here

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